India Now - page 26

COVE R S TORY
WA S T E M A N AG E M E N T
24
FEBRUARY-MARCH 2015
|
Pollution Control Board,
Ministry of Environment
and Forests came up with
the revised draft
Guidelines
for Common Biomedical
Waste Treatment Facilities
(CBWTF). This has paved
the way for establishment
of more CBWTF as a
cost-effective and prudent
source for management
of medical waste. Prof
(Dr) Ashok K Agarwal,
President, Indian Society
of Hospital Waste Manage-
ment (ISHWM), throw-
ing light on the hospital
waste generation scenario
says, “India generates
approximately 435,123 kg
of hospital waste per day
from its 156,276 health/
hospital facilities compris-
ing of about 1,604,880
beds. This waste com-
prises sharps (hypodermic
injection needles, blades,
glass etc), infected plas-
tics, body parts, laboratory
waste, infected dressing
materials, body fluids etc.”
The UN Basel convention
has described hospital waste
as the second most hazard-
ous waste after radioactive
waste. However, if managed
judiciously, hospital waste
can be used to generate
wealth/energy/manure by
recycling, says the Professor.
He also says that among the
several models of managing
biomedical waste, one of the
common and cost effective
methods is through com-
the Indian market will grow at a CAGR of 26.22 per cent
over the period 2015-19. According to a 2014 report published
by Teri Business Council for Sustainable Development and
Yes Bank titled
e-Waste Management in India – The Corporate
Imperative
, India is generating 2.7 million tonnes of e-waste
annually and recycling less than 2 per cent of this waste. Quot-
ing a MAIT-GTZ report of 2007, it added that approximately
5 per cent of this waste reaches authorised recylers, while
the rest goes to unauthorised recyclers. Given the size of the
unorganised players in the space the scope for investments
by corporate players is huge. The Government of India has
instituted several legislations to tackle the looming menace,
like Guidelines for Environmentally Sound Management of
Electronic Waste, issued by the CPCB in 2007; E-Waste (Man-
agement and Handling) Rules, 2011, operational from May
2012 and the E-Waste (Management and Handling) Rules,
2011, which are operational from May 2012. The Government
of India has authorised around 98 recyclers and state govern-
ments, like Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and
Delhi, among the top generators of e-waste, are also initiating
various schemes to promote responsible recycling.
India is also gearing up to tackle the menace of biomedical
waste through various initiatives. In February 2014, the Central
mon biomedical waste treatment and disposal facilities (CBM-
WTDF). The method is being adopted in most of the metro
cities and big towns. However, the rural healthcare centres
in India follow other models like deep burial. “Hospitals are
playing their role in segregation and collection of waste, but
there is a tremendous scope for improvement in the area and
the MoEF (GOI) should immediately finalise and announce
the revised BMW Rules,” says Prof Agarwal.
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Growth Drivers
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Options available for MSW treatment and utilisation
Municipal Solid Waste
Combustible
Bio-degradable
Bio-chemical conversion
Thermal process*
Gasification
Composting
Bio-fertiliser
Thermal energy
Anaerobic digestion
Bio-gas
Incineration
C&D wastes
Land filling
Alternate
building
material
Inerts
Pyrolysis
Steam Turbine
Biomethanation
Electricity
Generation
Power
*Refuse Derived Fuel
enhances the efficiency
of thermal processes
As per M&A
Rules 2000,
biodegradables
cannot be land
filled. So, no
combustible
gas collection is
considered
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