India Now - page 64

RURAL
UPDAT E
R U R A L S H O R E S
62
FEBRUARY-MARCH 2015
|
90
%
between
18–29 years
old
45 : 55
58
%
Graduates
Avg family size
5 people
50
%
from farming
background
75
%
employees
would
have
migrated
to cities if
not for RS
21
%
take up higher
education
through distance
learning
9
%
fund the
education of
their younger
siblings
50
%
increase
in annual
household
income for
75
%
employees
20
%
increase
in savings
despite
non-critical
expenditure
100
%
employees
have bank
account –
financial
inclusion
40
%
employees
purchase
consumer
durables after
joining RS
Awards &
Accolades
RuralShores
received the
NASSCOM
Innovation
Award in 2009;
Economic Times
BPO award in
2010 for being a
social catalyst
and BPO Summit
award in 2011–12
for being a
social
change agent
;
in 2012, it was a
finalist at USA’s
Edison Awards
under the Lifestyle
and Social Impact
category (the
second Indian
company to have
received the
recognition in the
past 25 years); in
2012 it won the
Asian Innovations
Award by Wall
Street Journal, HK
(among top three
best innovations
in Asia Pacific),
among other
awards.
proximity to urban business
centre, connectivity by road or
trains, uninterrupted power sup-
ply for at least five to six hours a
day and the convenience of inter-
net connectivity. “We have two
unique telecom links for all our
centres to ensure uninterrupted
connectivity. Thus if one link
is down, we continue our work
through the other link. All of our
centres are generator backed up
for continuous supply of electric-
ity,” informs Murali. The team
realised that the success of the
BPOs depended on the quality
of service deliveries. Initially,
they took up work in rule-based
transaction processing, local
language or dialect voice support
and processes of low to medium
complexity. The centres today are
providing 82 complex processes,
supporting 10 local languages
for 42 reputed brands spanning
eight industry segments.
“More than 50 per cent of our
employees are graduates, the rest
have 12th standard education. Jobs
are offered in accordance with
education levels and profile, while
preference is given to people from
low-income families,” reveals
Murali. Many of the employees
are now pursuing part time or dis-
tance education while supporting
their families. Though recruitment
is never a challenge for the com-
pany, training the rural youth in
soft skills that most of their urban
counterparts grow up with, teach-
ing them computers and English,
which for most is a first time, and
grooming them in professional
conduct, are time consuming. The
problems ranged frommass bunk
to attend a function in the village
or during the harvest season to
leave without notice. A standard
manual inducted in the training
took care of these initial creases.
After the first five centres were
established, each at an approxi-
mate investment of
`
6 million,
the team decided to seek a centre-
partner (CP) model for scaling
up. Murali and team realised that
given the vast diversity between
areas in the country and their
complete unfamiliarity with the
local milieu, a local partner with
knowledge of the system would
be more successful. They tied up
with a local entrepreneur who
was responsible for setting up the
infrastructure and managing it,
including availability of all asso-
ciated services and also helped
with recruitment. RuralShores
took the responsibility of service
delivery. The plan was to establish
80 per cent of the centres on CP
basis. Murali comments on the
advantages of this model thus, “It
enables RuralShores to focus on
its core competencies—business
development, service delivery
and customer management.”
Going forward, the vision for
RuralShores is to open one centre
in each of the 500 rural districts
of India, thereby providing sus-
tained employment to more than
100,000 rural youth, adds Murali.
RuralShores engaged its cus-
tomers with a value proposition
of cost, quality, scale and speed
with the icing of corporate social
responsibility and offered knowl-
edge intermediation by enabling
linkages between business
engagement and local participa-
tion by managing service deliv-
ery from the rural centres. “We
started off with clients through
reference. Based on the initial
orders, we then approached other
companies in similar fields or
similar operations, demonstrat-
ing our capabilities,” says Murali.
As the team ensured competitive
advantage through better deliver-
ies than urban BPOs, around
87 per cent of the businesses
that they landed are long term
outsourcing contracts. “These
long term contracts have also
been rolled over at the end of the
contract duration,” says Murali,
adding, “RuralShores has a client
engagement team which works
Social
Impact
1...,54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63 65,66,67,68
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